novafrica@novasbe.pt

External Members

With a diversity of backgrounds and areas of expertise, the NOVAFRICA external members are the network of researchers outside of the Nova School of Business and Economics who collaborate in the implementation of NOVAFRICA’s activities.

Tilman Brück
Development economics, economics of conflict and peace, methodology of empirical research in fragile and insecure environments

Professor Tilman Brück is the Founder and Director of ISDC – International Security and Development Center in Berlin and Team Leader of Development Economics at IGZ – Leibniz Institute of Vegetable and Ornamental Crops, Germany. He is also the Co-Founder and Co-Director of the Households in Conflict Network” (HiCN). Professor Brück’s research interests focus on the economics of household behaviour and well-being in conflict-affected and fragile economies, including the measurement of violence and conflict in household surveys and the impact evaluation of peace-building programs in conflict-affected areas and of humanitarian assistance. He was previously Director of the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI) and Professor of Development Economics at Humboldt-University of Berlin. He obtained his doctorate in economics from the University of Oxford.

Pedro Carneiro
Labor Economics, Economics of Education, Development Economics, Programme Evaluation

Pedro Carneiro is a Professor of Economics at University College London and an economist in the IFS’ Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice (Cemmap). His research interests include development economics, labour economics, the economics of education and microeconometrics. In the past he has examined issues such as the returns to education, human capital policy, and labor regulation in developing countries. He has studied poverty and education programs in several countries in Latin America, Africa and Eastern Europe.

Adeline Delavande
Economic Development, Health, Education, Early Childhood Development

Adeline Delavande is a Professor of Economics at the Institute for Social and Economic Research of the University of Essex in the UK. Her expertise is on methodological issues related to the elicitation of probabilistic expectations in developed and developing countries, and on how probabilistic expectations can be used to improve inference on individuals’ decision-making under uncertainty. Substantive topics of interest include contraception, risky sexual behavior in high HIV prevalence environment, retirement, education, and early childhood development. She has been involved in many data collection efforts, including in Malawi, Pakistan, India, Bangladesh, the US and the UK.

Marcel Fafchamps
Marcel Fafchamps
Economic development, market institutions and social networks

Marcel Fafchamps is a senior fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (FSI) and a member of the Center on Democracy, Development and the Rule of Law. Fafchamps is a professor (by courtesy) for the Department of Economics at Stanford University. Prior to joining FSI, from 1999-2013, Fafchamps served as professor of development economics for the Department of Economics and Mansfield College at Oxford University. He also served as deputy director and then co-director of the Center for the Study of African Economies. His current research focuses on entrepreneurship, factor markets, and the efficiency of social networks in Africa and South Asia. Fafchamps also has ongoing research on political economy issues in Africa and Asia.

Ana Margarida Fernandes
International Trade, Consequences of FDI

Ana Margarida Fernandes is a Senior Economist in the Trade and International Integration Unit of the Development Research Group at the World Bank. She holds a B.A. from Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Portugal and an M.A. and a Ph.D. in Economics from Yale University and she joined the World Bank in 2002. Her research interests include the consequences of openness to trade and FDI for firm-level outcomes such as productivity, innovation and quality upgrading in manufacturing and services sectors and more broadly the determinants of firm performance, including the role of the business environment. She has also worked on professional services in Africa. Recently her work has been focusing on the one hand on the impact evaluation of trade-related policy interventions (such as export promotion and customs reforms) and on the other hand on exporter growth and dynamics, their links to policies and to development. Since 2011 she has been managing the Exporter Dynamics Database project. Her research has been published in the Review of Economics and Statistics, the Journal of International Economics, the Journal of Development Economics, the World Bank Economic Review, among other scholarly publications.

Dean Karlan
Dean Karlan
Development Economics and Behavioral Economics

Dean Karlan is a Professor of Economics at Yale University. Karlan is President of Innovations for Poverty Action, a non-profit organization dedicated to discovering and promoting effective solutions to global poverty problems. Karlan is on the Executive Committee of the Board of Directors of the M.I.T. Jameel Poverty Action Lab. As a social entrepreneur, he is co-Founder of stickK.com, a website that uses lessons from behavioral economics to help people reach personal goals, such as weight loss and smoking cessation, through commitment contracts. In 2011, Karlan co-authored More Than Good Intentions: How a New Economics is Helping to Solve Global Poverty. Karlan received a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, and was named an Alfred P. Sloan Fellow. His research focuses on microeconomic issues of financial decision-making, specifically employing experimental methodologies to examine what works, what does not, and why in interventions in microfinance, health, behavioral economics and charitable giving. In microfinance, he has studied credit impact, interest rate policy, savings product design, credit scoring policies, entrepreneurship training, and group versus individual liability. Karlan received a Ph.D. in Economics from M.I.T., an M.B.A. and an M.P.P. from the University of Chicago, and a B.A. in International Affairs from the University of Virginia. Blogs regularly on Freakonomics.

Pedro Silva Martins
Pedro Silva Martins
Labour Economics

Pedro Silva Martins is Professor of Applied Economics at Queen Mary, University of London, and Research Fellow of CEG-IST (Lisbon) and IZA (Bonn). He holds a PhD from the University of Warwick and a degree from Nova Lisbon, both in economics. His academic research has focused on the roles of schooling, business cycles and globalisation on the wage distribution; and the effects of employment institutions upon different worker and firm outcomes. Current interests also include activation measures, collective bargaing and training. Pedro Silva Martins was Secretary of State for Employment in the Government of Portugal from 2011 until 2013. During this period, he was responsible for reforms in areas such as employment protection legislation, active labour market policies, the public employment service, apprenticeships, the European Social Fund, and tripartite dialogue. His research is published in the Journal of Labor Economics, American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, European Economic Review, Journal of the European Economic Association, Labour Economics, Journal of Population Economics, British Journal of Industrial Relations, Economics Letters and other journals and edited volumes.

Paulo Santos
Poverty Persistence, Poverty Dynamics, Social Networks

Paulo Santos is a Senior Lecturer in Economics at Monash University. He has completed his PhD in 2007 at Cornell University. He joined the Department of Economics at Monash in 2011, after being a Lecturer at The University of Sydney. His research interests are at the intersection of economics and sociology and also of economics and natural resource management, and particularly in using insights from these different areas into understanding why poverty is persistent. He has worked in the field in Ethiopia, Cambodia, Laos and Indonesia.

Elsa de Morais Sarmento
Development Economics, Applied Microeconomics, Impact Evaluation

Elsa de Morais Sarmento is an applied economist and professional evaluator with experience in applied research, international development, monitoring and impact evaluation. She is Principal Evaluation Officer at the Independent Development Evaluation (IDEV) of the African Development Bank and lecturer at the University of Aveiro (Portugal). Previously, she worked for international organisations (World Bank, United Nations (UNDP, WIPO), European Commission, Organisation of Eastern Caribbean States, and with the OECD and the IMF). She has broad international experience, having worked in over 50 countries, 40 of which with direct field experience.
She is experienced with high-level interactions and policy dialogue, being appointed to several Director positions at the Research Office of the Portuguese Ministry of Economy, and having acted as policy adviser at the House of Commons (UK), for several African governments and international research projects. She has lectured for over a decade in several academic institutions, including the Nova School of Business and Economics, and worked as a researcher at the CEP (LSE), European Parliament, Universidade Católica Portuguesa, amongst others.
Her research interests lie at the crossroads between development economics, applied microeconomics and impact evaluation. She has worked in projects related to Competiveness, Policy Reform, Economic modelling, Regional integration, Governance, Aid Effectiveness, Access to finance, Private Sector (SME development, Entrepreneurship), Infrastructure (Energy, Transport, Water and Sanitation), Sustainable Economics, Environment and Forestry. She holds a BsC from Nova School of Business and Economics and an MA from the University of Leicester and Universidade do Minho.

Sandra Sequeira
Sandra Sequeira
Economic Development, Applied Microeconomics

Sandra Sequeira is an Assistant Professor in Development Economics at the Department of International Development at the London School of Economics. Her main research interests are in development economics and applied microeconomics. She is currently engaged in research projects related to state capacity, transport infrastructure and growth; consumer prosocial behavior; and the determinants of financial access, networking capital and technology adoption for private sector development. She holds a BA from Nova School of Business and Economics, an MA from the Fletcher School and a PhD from Harvard University.

Dean Yang
Dean Yang
International Migration, Technology Adoption, Microfinance, Behavioral Economics, Disasters and Risk, Human Capital, International Trade, Crime and Corruption

Dean Yang is a Professor at the University of Michigan, where he holds appointments in the Department of Economics and the Ford School of Public Policy. His current research is primarily on financial services for the poor, international migration, and areas at the intersection of these topics. Other past and current topics of interest include health, disasters, international trade, and political economy. Methodologically, much of his work involves randomized controlled trials in field settings, but other work involves unearthing novel data sources and combining them with existing secondary datasets for analysis of development issues. He is currently running survey work and field experiments among Filipino migrant workers and their families, and among rural microloan clients in Malawi. His past and current field project locations include El Salvador, Guatemala, Indonesia, Malawi, Mozambique, the Philippines, as well as migrant populations of Filipinos in Italy, Indians in Qatar, and Salvadorans and Kenyans in the U.S. He teaches courses in development economics and microeconomics at the undergraduate, master, and Ph.D. levels. A native of the Philippines, he received his undergraduate and Ph.D. degrees in economics from Harvard University.