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Directed Giving: Evidence from an Inter-Household Transfer Experiment in Mozambique

  • Directed Giving: Evidence from an Inter-Household Transfer Experiment in Mozambique
  • Directed Giving: Evidence from an Inter-Household Transfer Experiment in Mozambique
  • Directed Giving: Evidence from an Inter-Household Transfer Experiment in Mozambique
  • Directed Giving: Evidence from an Inter-Household Transfer Experiment in Mozambique
  • Directed Giving: Evidence from an Inter-Household Transfer Experiment in Mozambique

Project Info

Principal Investigators

Cátia Batista
Daniel Silverman
Dean Yang

Field Coordination

Cheney Wells

Partnership

Banco Oportunidade de Moçambique (BOM)

Managing Institution

Innovations for Poverty Action (IPA)

Funding

Agricultural Technology Adoption Initiative (ATAI)
International Growth Center (IGC)

About this Project

A collaborative effort with Banco Oportunidade de Moçambique

Transfers between families are extremely common and substantial in developing countries such as Mozambique. Why do people give? What are the main barriers to giving and how can they be overcome?

Basic answers to these questions are provided by running a lab-in-the-field experiment. Study participants in urban Mozambique play dictator games where their counterpart is the closest person to them outside their household.

In these games, individuals share more with counterparts when they have the option of giving in kind (in the form of goods), compared to giving that must be in cash. Results suggest that this effect is driven by a desire to control how recipients use gifted resources. Standard economic determinants such as the rate of return to giving and the size of the endowment also affect giving, but the effects are significantly smaller than the effect of the in-kind option.